Rules and Regulations Twitter contest – iRead With @ilearnwith

Enter our Twitter contest for a chance to win a $20 Amazon Gift Card!

  1. To participate users should follow us on Twitter (@ilearnwith) and retweet one of our tweets
  2. Contest validity dates are from March 28, 2014 to March 31st, 2014 at 11:59pm PST
  3. Winner will be picked randomly from a draw
  4. Winner will be announced on April 3 via Twitter
  5. If winner doesn’t answer in 48 hrs after receiving winning tweet he/she will be disqualified and another winner will be chosen.
Posted in Uncategorized

Tribal Nova to add Nelvana’s ‘Max & Ruby’ to Series of Exciting New Science Apps Teaching Kids about Materials and Motion.

MONTREAL, CANADA (November 28, 2013) – Tribal Nova, a Houghton Mifflin Harcourt company, and the developer of the award winning PBS KIDS PLAY! online learning program, today announces that its latest educational gaming app  – Max & Ruby science educational games – is now available in the App Store. An important addition to its award winning i Learn With suite of early childhood educational apps, the Max & Ruby app for iPad, iPhone and iPod touch, teaches children about coordination and motion, and introduces them to the properties of objects, materials and liquids in a way that is truly fun and educational.

The new science app features Max & Ruby, the hilarious bunny siblings from Nelvana’s much loved animated series, which airs on Nickelodeon in the U.S. and is based on the books by internationally acclaimed author Rosemary Wells. Here, Max and his older sister Ruby can be seen in three different games, having fun as they learn about shapes, the properties of objects and the effect of water in its different states. The third game will allow children to realize their creativity by creating their own Max & Ruby world, while playing with characters from the series.

Max & Ruby science educational games is very dear to us, not only because of the amazing characters but because it explores new subjects and teaches kids innovative and important real-life concepts like inertia, weight, speed and water states” said Pierre Le Lann, Co-Manager of Tribal Nova. “We hope that after playing with the app, children will want to try their new knowledge out in the real world.”

Max & Ruby science educational games is available for free from the AppStore.  A single purchase of $2.99, will unlock over 40 new levels. The app is available in both English and French.

The i Learn With app series is a curriculum-oriented, game-based school readiness program for children ages 3 to 6. Based on National Standards and designed with the help of teachers and developmental experts, this suite of educational apps includes games that teach math, language, literacy, healthy development and more.  The program adjusts the level of difficulty for each child, recommends personalized learning paths and integrates highly engaging rewards for educational achievements.

All apps from the i Learn With series are available on iPhone, iPad and iPod touch and provide tracking across multiple iOS devices. Children can start playing on an iPad, for example, and later continue playing on their parent’s iPhone at the same level where they left off, without losing any of their progress or rewards.

You can find Max & Ruby science educational games in the App Store: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/ilearnwith-max-ruby-en/id686518520

Posted in Uncategorized

i Learn With celebrates 2nd anniversary with free access to 22 learning games

Summary:
To celebrate its second anniversary Tribal Nova, a Houghton Mifflin Harcourt company, upgrades its “i Learn With” suite of learning apps and games for children by offering free access to over 20 games.

MONTREAL, CANADA (September 6, 2013) – Today, Tribal Nova, the developers behind the award winning PBS KIDS PLAY! online learning program, celebrates the second anniversary of its educational program “i Learn With” by upgrading all apps and permanently offering free access to over 20 learning games within the whole program.

“In these two years we have gone from only a few users to 6 million downloads per year and 200,000 sessions per day. This growth was only possible thanks to parents and teachers that trust our apps and the children that enjoy them. We want to share the entire program and its full range of subjects with them, and that’s why we opened up the first level of every game within the apps”, explains Pierre Le Lann Co-Manager of Tribal Nova.

i Learn With” is a curriculum-oriented, game-based school readiness program for children ages 3-6, available for Apple® and Android™ devices. Based on National Standards and designed with the help of teachers and developmental experts, this suite of education apps proves that games can be both fun and educational.

i Learn With apps track children’s success rates and adjust level of difficulty in order to adapt to their developmental needs across math, literacy, science, language development and more. Parents can monitor their child’s progress in the app or through email alerts and compare it with children that are the same age. The program also recommends a personalized learning path for each child and integrates highly engaging rewards for educational achievements. All i Learn With apps are certified by the kidsSAFE® Seal Program, which guarantees the safety practices of children-friendly websites, games and apps.

All current users of the i Learn With apps can update to the new versions at no cost.

Posted in Uncategorized

i Learn With Suite of Educational Apps Now Available in the Google Play Store for Android

Press Release – July 12, 2013

MONTREAL, CANADA – Tribal Nova, a Houghton Mifflin Harcourt company and the developer behind the award winning PBS KIDS PLAY! online learning program, announces that its awarded i Learn With suite of educational apps for children in Preschool and Kindergarten is now available for Android.

“i Learn With apps have received millions of downloads on iOS, rave reviews from the press and constant 4/5 star rating from users. We are thrilled to bring our kids apps along with our technology and game based learning expertise to Android tablets and to make this educational program available to a wider audience of parents and children”, explains Pierre Le Lann, co-Manager of Tribal Nova.

i Learn With is a curriculum-oriented, game-based school readiness program for children ages 3-6. Based on National Standards and designed with the help of teachers and developmental experts, this suite of learning apps proves that games can be both fun and truly educational.

i Learn With apps track children’s success rates and adjust the level of difficulty in order to adapt to their developmental needs across math, literacy, science and language development and more.
Parents can monitor their child’s progress in the app or through email alerts and compare it with children the same age. The program also adjusts the level of difficulty to each child’s abilities, recommends a personalized learning path for each child and integrates highly engaging rewards for educational achievements.

The i Learn With suite of educational apps for children can be found on the Google Play Store at play.google.com.

Posted in Uncategorized

Launch of our new app “i Learn With Poko: Emotions and Colors!”

There are not many apps on social development for children in the App Store, which makes us even prouder to launch ours today!

With i Learn With Poko: Emotions and Colors!, your child will learn to identify emotions felt by the characters by watching a short video or an animated clip. He or she will also learn how to find the best tactics to help the characters work through their emotional situations.
And all with the help of our one and only Poko!

And the best thing is, you can try this app for FREE! Don’t wait any longer and download i Learn With Poko: Emotions and Colors! NOW!

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD EMOTIONS AND COLORS FOR FREE!

Description:

Poko, Bibi and Minus learn about emotions by watching short animated stories and they explore painting by playing with primary colors. Your child can play different games with them: by choosing little pictograms that mirror the expressed emotions or by selecting and mixing colors for Poko’s drawings.

Emotions! – Your child will watch a short video or an animated clip and will have to identify the emotions felt by the characters in the clip by choosing the right emoticons. Listen to Poko, Bibi and Minus’ stories and suggest the best tactics to help the characters work through their emotional situations.

Colors! – Select, mix and apply the correct paint colors that match Poko’s artwork.

Primary skills taught: Arts and social development

Secondary skills:
- Listening and comprehension
- Problem solving
- Visual and kinesthetic learning
- Critical thinking (elimination process)

Copyright © 2005 Poko. Poko is a trademark of Halifax Film Ltd. All rights reserved.

Posted in Uncategorized

Giveaways

Win a $200 Amazon Gift Card

a Rafflecopter giveaway

The giveaway will end on October 6th, 11:59pm EST.
If you have any questions, feel free to send us an email at marketing@ilearnwith.com.

GOOD LUCK!

Posted in Uncategorized

Concours

Posted in Uncategorized

Teach Kids Phonics in the Family Wagon!

by Carissa Rogers from www.goodncrazy.com

With 3 kids and also as a Foster parent I’ve had my share of teaching very young kids their ABCs and 123s. And believe it or not I’ve always found the best way to approach phonics is in the car!
I know it sounds a little crazy but especially with my younger kids we end up spending large chunks of time in the car with the after school run-around for the older kids. Plus summer road trips, holiday trips and everything in-between means logging a lot of miles for a 4 year old.
Car time is perfect to encourage your emergent readers and help them get ready for Kindergarten. And when you’re busy in the car, navigating (or sleeping on long trips!) handing them a tablet or smartphone with pre-school educational apps will keep the learning fun and interactive.

4 GoodNCrazy Tips For Teaching Pre-Schoolers Phonics In The Family Wagon:

1. Use What They Know
Keep to the things in their life they know and love. Daddy’s name starts with ‘Da’. Mommy starts with ‘Ma’. Name other siblings, friends, grandparents etc. see if you can come up with REAL people they know to fill up the whole phonics alphabet!

2. Simple Engagement
Ask your kiddo to name the things around him or her. (Inside the car, outside the car and in their brain.) Ask them to repeat the beginning sound of each item they name. Repetition wins here. The more they can repeat all those sounds the faster they will connect those sounds with the actual letters.

3. Use Technology
No it doesn’t make you a bad mom to hand your kid your SmartPhone in a restaurant or plan for a few new apps on the family iPad for a long road trip! I’m amazed at what my 5 year old has learned from a few well-placed moments using my iPad.

My current favorite phonics app is TeachMe: Kindergarten from 24x7digital. For more Pre-school educational app ideas check out Famigo.com, a great family app review site. Other apps we love include: Sid the Science Kid (especially the jokes area!), All Bob Books apps and Spanish Language apps like Little Pim. I find that the comparison of another language in an easy app form like InstaSpanish Kids Lessons helps them learn English phonics and they don’t even know it!

4. Recruit Older Siblings
My older kids are experts in teaching their sibs small lessons leading up to being big readers. After all they were in the same boat only a few years earlier! I find that a younger sibling will sit and listen to an older kid read sometimes longer than they let me read to them!

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , ,

Toddlers and Technology: Embrace or Reject?

by Jeana Shandraw from www.SurfandSunshine.com

Introducing technology to children at an early age seems to be a hot topic these days. Most experts sternly frown upon any tech exposure at all before the age of 2, with a consensus of 2 hours per day being the max allowed thereafter. While I agree that these generalized guidelines may be appropriate for “mindless” technological entertainment, I don’t feel they can or should be applied to early education technology.

Now, “what is this early education technology you speak of?” you ask. My personal definition would be “any type of technology or advancement that is introduced to children at an early age to enhance or further educational learning or skills”. (Yes, I just made that up. Please feel free to add it to Wikipedia for me.) As with all things in life, to me, it is what you make of it. When parents make a conscientious choice of the programs their children are exposed to, they are able to actively cultivate a lifetime enjoyment and thirst for learning. (Woah folks, I’m on a roll!) I not only embrace technology in early education, I would, like totally, marry it if I could.

Having been brought up with a techie geek for a dad, I was constantly immersed in every new electronic gadget we could acquire. We went from the Atari (800, 5200 and ST) to the Commodore (64 and 128) and then made the leap to our first personal computer – a Tandy (Zork anyone?).

Fast forward to 10 years later and I’m now teaching my dad about this cool “internet” that I used daily as a Physics Assistant at USC – years before it became commercialized into the WWW in 1995.
The point to my history lesson here was that it was inevitable that I would also unabashedly throw computers and technology at my first born! Cut me open and I will probably bleed binary 0s and 1s. I readily admit that my son has received countless hours of technological exposure since he was just a little guy, and I would not change a thing.

It, of course, started with my father. He didn’t let me down and gave my son his very own iPad when he was just 10 months old. By the time he was one year old, he could recognize the upper case letters of the alphabet. With the help of a Baby Sign Language DVD (yes, that he watched on the evil television), he also knew over 100 words and was “speaking” in sentences to me. At 18 months old, Whistler could recognize all upper and lower case letters of the alphabet. At 20 months old, he could say all the letters of the alphabet and numbers 0-9. I whole heartedly give credit for this feat to this iPad app.

I’m not a certified instructor or accredited teacher, but I do know that repetition is key in learning new things, especially for children. The iPad is a wonderful tool that accomplishes this task while also engaging and encouraging its users. (When was the last time a flash card said your name and sang you a song for getting the answer right?) I am, however, very picky about what he watches on TV and plays on the iPad. All shows and apps must have an educational value, so shows like Tom and Jerry or apps like that stupid cat that records and repeats back what you say in a high pitched voice are NOT allowed.

I can remember early on, when the other women at Mommy and Me would look at me in disgust as I handed over my iPhone to my son after class while I spoke to another mom. They close mindedly assumed that I was merely handing him a distraction and didn’t bother to look and see what was really going on. He was learning. He was creating words from the letters on the screen. He was naming animals that most adults didn’t even know existed. That “thing” that the other moms were so petrified of exposing their children to “too early” had placed my child leaps and bounds ahead of theirs intellectually, which meant he was also able to communicate with me more effectively.

My son has a sweet disposition by nature, but I am certain that without his advanced communication skills (acquired from exposure to a ton of technology from mom) we would not have been able to “skip” things like temper tantrums and inconsolable crying. We luckily learned to communicate with each other very early on and this, I feel, has created an incredible blanket of confidence and security that has only strengthened our relationship. I have found that when used in moderation, and not as a replacement babysitter, early exposure to technology can provide some amazing benefits to both you and your children.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , ,

Why Educational Apps are Perfect for Kids with Special Needs

by Deanne Shoyer from www.smallbutkindamighty.com

Both my children are autistic, and like a previous blogger in this series, Rebecca, I’ve been amazed at how many therapeutic applications there are for my children on the iPad. You may have seen the 60 Minutes piece which featured the research currently being conducted at the Beverley School in Toronto. This research seeks to quantify exactly how iOS devices can help children with special needs and preliminary results are showing an increase in communication of 20%.

But can general educational apps also be helpful for children with special needs? My answer to that question is a resounding, yes! I find them particularly useful for my children and I’ve outlined below some of the reasons why. High quality, educational apps do the following:

• They engage. Another previous blogger, Julia, wrote about how much fun kids have playing apps. My son Owen has very narrow interests and so teaching him play skills has always been a challenge, but he loves his iPad. He would play apps like Zoo Train for hours if I let him.

• They teach diverse skills. Unlike television, which also engages my children, when my kids play with apps on their iPad they learn a variety of skills. Take an app like i Learn With Boing: Ice Land Adventures for example – the primary benefit for me in playing with apps like these is that they improve my children’s motor skills and hand-eye co-ordination. If they also pick up information on letters, sounds and words along the way, well that’s a bonus.

• Generalize skills. For my children, the iPad has been a gateway to more experiences, a safe place where they can play, try new things and gain confidence. For example, Owen loves Eric Carle and so I downloaded My Very First App for him. He quickly became a maestro at the matching pairs game and with that new-found confidence he developed using the iPad, I was able to get him to play ‘real-life’ matching games.

• They make abstract concepts concrete. It’s tough for all children to learn abstract concepts like sharing but when the penguin game in i Learn With Boing: Ice Land Adventures requires them to literally share the iPad in 2-player mode, they not only understand the concept more readily but they learn a valuable life lesson too – that sharing doesn’t necessarily lessen their experience, sometimes it means double the fun!

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , ,